The Tree

Chapter 1

From the sandhills of the Murray River, up through Western New South Wales and into Southern Queensland, the Murray Pine, subspecies of the White Cypress Pine, slowly and quietly grows.

Their grey-green foliage and furrowed, grey bark has been part of the landscape for ten thousand years. Over that time these hardy trees have adapted perfectly to hot, dry conditions, its roots plunging deep into the soil to find moisture far below the surface.

Since people first discovered the Murray Pine it’s been highly prized. Australian Aborigines used its resins as adhesives, its bark to craft fibres. European settlers quickly fell in love with the trees too: its honey coloured timber, its fresh, lemony-pine aroma, its incredible durability, even in harsh Australian conditions. Today the Murray Pine is renowned the world over as a premium Australian timber.

A tree this good doesn’t grow overnight. It can take a whole generation for a young pine to mature -this is not the stuff of slash-and-burn commercial plantations, but patient, careful forestry. When the Murray Pine finally does come to the end of its quiet percolations, the result is a simply sublime tree, one that naturally repels termites and shuns rot, one that yields timber so hardy that chemical treatments are useless, one that does not shrink or decay in the soil, one that lasts decades upon decades, looks spectacular, and smells even better – in other words, every bit a tree worth waiting for.

Murray Pine Cypress

forest